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Question

sophie53
Can I compost old eggs?
Topics:

Answer

You can definitely compost raw eggs and their shells, but you would do well to dig a small hole in your compost pile, crack them in there, and cover it all up so as not to attract animals.

Question details

I know I can compost eggshells. Can I compost a cracked and beaten egg? I have some free range eggs and some store bought eggs that are on this side of being bad...too bad to hard boil them! Thank you!

Also, depending upon how many eggs you have, I would probably crack "a lot of eggs" into a bucket, beat them up with some water & pour them into several holes or trenches in the compost & cover them with compost. A concentration of old eggs could potentially make an odor. As you might guess, my compost bins in town were right on a shared fenceline.
I had thought of the odor. I might do two batches. I also heard a cracked egg will help a plant grow. I did that last year and someone told me to put a "whole egg" in the hole. Oh, that is not a good idea. They need to be cracked first! That is how I learn!
Once an old, cracked, and beaten egg sits for a couple of days in the heat, it can be sprinkled around the yard's border to keep out all sorts of critters. Once it dries, it is not very smelly, but the critters still can smell it. I actually started a batch of this in early spring, when I kept getting eggs whose yolks just fell apart when I cracked them. It was still somewhat cool outside, where I had the brew aging. A stray cat pulled my protection away, ate it all, and lived. now that we have hit 90 plus degrees F, I think I could try it again.
Josephine, that is great info! I think it would work for deer - since they dislike organic scent sources that are not THEM. PP And - given the right source & production circumstances - there might be a viable, commercial garden PRODUCT in your experience. I am not kidding. Are there any chicken farms around your region?
Actually, the "Fence" line of critter repellants are based in rotten eggs. PP I have a couple of long-long-long chicken houses about 1/2 mile from my house and this whole part of the state has chicken farmers. I don't have a pickup or I'd get me a bunch of manure each Fall. I might borrow one this Fall, since it has become obvious that my ground needs more nitrogen. I put in oragnic matter each Fall, but the ground is so poor that it needs a lot more organic matter, and since it is acidic, it tends to drop out the phosphorous, so chicken poop would be great for it, hitting all of the above needs. I just don't trust all of the stuff they put into their feed and water when they raise them like that.
Good thinking about the industrial chicken meds in their manure. There is so much info out now about human & animal meds of all kinds persisting on into the water in measureable quantities. Could you have some chickens of your own? People in our town are starting to keep chickens & are more successful than i would have imagined.
I am halfway through with building an 8' x 8' x6' tall chicken coop. I keep having problems with my neck--several injuries to it over the decades--and I'm at a point where I need some strength to finish it. Hopefully this month. I have raised chickens before and like being the county so I can have poultry without any restrictions--except to name them all so if they get on the road I can call them pets and not get a $1000 fine for having livestock on the road! PP I even have one of those non-toxic liners for a pond--EDM or something like that. When I dig, I run into so many large, flat rocks that take chains and vehicles to move, that I have not gotten it into the ground now for two years! I like being in charge of my own food chain, but it might take a few more years to really get there. I could keep a half-dozen hens, and they could feed themselves on this place. PP Oh, well, things work out in eternity better than they do here, sometimes. That's a big relief! I was really discouraged for a few years here, but am not so much now. I know some of the neighbors much better now, and I am not struggling with Technical College anymore.

 

 

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