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Regrowing Rather Than Throwing

Feb 15, 2013
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Are you throwing those vegetable trimmings into the compost bin?  How about regrowing some instead?  Apparently, regrowing certain fruit and vegetables has been around for ages.

I usually make vegetable broth or brine out of my trimmings, but wanted to try this regrow method after a friend brought it to my attention.  I started with scallions, leeks, bok choy, celery, and lettuce. It worked so well I could almost see them regenerate before my eyes.

Here’s how to get underway with any of the veggies listed above.  First,  start with fresh organic produce. Next, cut the base of the stem where the root is attached, leaving an inch or two.  Place the base in water to cover the roots, leaving the top exposed.  Then find a home next to a sunny window and watch it quickly regenerate.

Change the water every other day to keep things fresh.  

Cut what you need from the scallions and leeks, and leave them in water to continue growing.

Occasionally mist the tops of the bok choy, celery, and lettuce to keep them moist and after a week or so, plant them in the garden accordingly.  Make sure to plant them deep enough so only the leaves are above the soil.

This is a fun project for kids, and a great way to quickly start some new veggies!

Comments

I have started doing this, but I am curious. Is the nutritional value the same in the regrown vegetables?
I have been regrowing some of my vegetables and have great results. I've done it with celery, scallions, watercress, carrots and lettuce. It is also a great way to start lemongrass. Am always thrilled to see the new roots emerge in the water.
I tried the celery, but it rotted - guess I used too much water. I do it with spring onions and it works great, but those I just plant outright.

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