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Succession Planting

Apr 22, 2010

Succession Planting
If you would like to have a continual supply of garden veggies its time for some succession planting. I just got done planting another succession of sugar snap peas and another flat of lettuce, broccoli and cabbage. I also planted some Swiss chard and spinage in another flat. I transplanted some tomato starts from our starter flat to small pots. We have had a very cold spring so my plants are growing very slowly.
I am visiting a friend and helping them out in their garden, we are going to seed some of their garden beds outside with lettuce, spinage, swiss chard, beets and carrots. We also transplanted some large tomato plants into wall of waters which is a new thing for me. The wall of waters are plastic collars that you fill with water and they surround the tomato plants and keep them warm even in cold weather and frosts.
On my friends ranch I am also transplanting some lettuce into garden beds that I started in a flat in mid February.
Looking forward to some sunny days…..

"The early Planter eats the early fruit"
Farmer Dave

Comments

I really like to plant radishes every 10-15 days to get a even supply. Any ideals on how to grow them in the Hot summer sun?
I must say I have only grown radishes in the spring but I have grown lettuce all summer by watering it in the hotest part of the day with an overhead sprinkler for about 1/2 hour. It keeps it sweet even in the heat. You could try that for radishes and let us know how it works.
I must say I have only grown radishes in the spring but I have grown lettuce all summer by watering it in the hotest part of the day with an overhead sprinkler for about 1/2 hour. It keeps it sweet even in the heat. You could try that for radishes and let us know how it works.
Yes, succession planting is the way to go, especially with things that grow quickly! I love planting a small row of different kinds of lettuce each week or two. And radishes grow so fast you really need to keep planting small rows of them until it gets too hot. Then I resume in the late summer when the worst of the heat is over.
I am late sowing my 3rd row of radishes. When in degrees do you think it is to hot? We (SC Gardeners) get 90's to 115's some years.
Hi Joel, My policy is, if the seed is cheap (like radish), just sow another modest row every week or two until it's rather obvious the seedlings are baking. lol! I definitely don't do this with my expensive french lettuce seeds! ;)

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