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Sunshine all weekend, so the vegetable garden gets a makeover.

Apr 11, 2010

After a full month of continual rain we had a weekend of sunshine!  Hopefully that was the final onslaught of the wet season.

I cut back more of the pigeon pea side shoots allowing all this lovely sunshine onto the vegetables seedlings that survived the rainy onslaught.  I wove those shoots in and out of the uprights creating a sort of rustic cucumber trellis.  The helconia branches I kept for plant supports have rotted, so that idea has been shelved.  Oh well, you live and learn.

I planted some more lettuce seeds, more beets and silverbeet.  those are the seeds that came up and drowned.  The bok choy, radish, cucumber and gemsquash have done ok.   I also transplanted some tomato seedlings into the ground, planting them deeply so that they can form a good network of roots.  They are in the framework behind the row of cucumbers.

 

 

I was left a couple of Malay apple trees when the gardening group met at my place a couple of weeks ago.  I gave one to my neighbour as she has a bigger yard than mine.  Then I had an idea to create an espaliered tree against the back fence.  I have never done this before, but  Glen has done a few on his allotment in England, so I will be looking to his pages for advice....   It is still little, but I planted it next to the passionfruit vine that did so well. They always succumb to woody passionfruit virus after a year or two, and I have already started another passionfruit a little further down the fence.  Its roots can go down into the neighbours chook pen and there are comfrey plants to the left of it.  So now I have a few new projects to work on, as our "winter" season begins.  

 

Comments

Your garden is looking well established now, I remember when you first started it. Have a great day. We have had lots of rain now and our seeds are starting to grow. First up is the fenugreek, it is great to grow and eat.
Hi Maggie, yes I was digging in the garden over the weekend and amazed at all the earthworms - there was not a single one just over a year ago when we first moved in. I have never tried fenugreek, just used the seeds in curries - do you eat the leaves as well?
Hi Gillian Yes, you eat the leaves, they are delicious in Indian dishes. They are highly nutritous and look amazing if fried in a little oil. They become bright green and translucent and make a great garnish. Just buy some spouting fenugreek seed and just plant it and use the young leaves in dahls or saags or with half spinach and half fenugreek or added to roti or other Indian dishes. You can buy frozen fenugreek in Indian shops.
Oh! fenugreek is called methi in Indian recipes.
Oh I have often seen methi in recipes! Good idea to look for the sprouting seeds, I often get a mixed pack and in fact might have some in my pantry right now.
What would be good on this website would be a database giving the different names for things. Like for instance i call it rocket, but others call it Arugula i think.
That is a great idea Glen, I have seen one somewhere, but do not remember where it was. I guess you are busy planting up your summer garden.
That is a great idea Glen, I have seen one somewhere, but do not remember where it was. I guess you are busy planting up your summer garden.
Where do I get the seeds?
I have one White Wonder with curling leaves. It is producing tomatoes, but what is the leaf curl? Treated and inspect for aphids and blight regularly. Boosted with nutrients. The rest of the plants seem fine. But very low production, blooms, but fruit is slow to set. Due to so much rain I guess. I am in Nashville, and we have had floods. Any ideas? God I miss the old site, hate the new one.
Leaf roll can becaused from too much moisture, lower leaves roll first, then move up the plant. Leaves feel leathery or firm. Best Control uniform watering. Leafhoppers suck the sap from the leaves, causing them to curl & brown margin on the leaves. Please check out the Groups, Garden Pest Groups, Tomatoes, tomatoes Group.
Hi Gillian I,m certain you will enjoy and get enjoyment from training your apple tree. My trees are just coming into flower now. Thats why a fruit tree is twice as good as any other type. You get flowers in the spring and fruit in the autumn. Just remember, sometimes you have to be cruel to be kind, and that applies when pruning espaliers. Good Luck Glenn
Thanks Glen, I will be coming back to you for more advice once my little tree gets a bit bigger. At the moment it it just one branch so I will let it get established first. Nothing else I should be doing at this stage is there? I bet you must be busy now on your allotment since spring has sprung?
Hi Gillian I,m certain you will enjoy and get enjoyment from training your apple tree. My trees are just coming into flower now. Thats why a fruit tree is twice as good as any other type. You get flowers in the spring and fruit in the autumn. Just remember, sometimes you have to be cruel to be kind, and that applies when pruning espaliers. Good Luck Glenn

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