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Chicken bone broth

Jul 31, 2012
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So many ways to make good bone broth.

Here's the easy way I do it, with appreciation to MANY sites I've learned from):

Bones from 2 roasted whole chickens plus 1 lb of chicken feet and/or backs/necks (for all that connective tissue to help form gelatin), all good quality free range.

 

Put bones in stock pot and cover with water. 

Add a little vinegar. Let soak uncovered for 1-2 hours.

Turn on heat until boil.

Skim off the foam.

Add some vegetables: carrots, onions, celery

Turn way down to low simmer - 8-12 hours - mostly in the oven overnight, partly uncovered at just under 200. (Keep the simmer super gentle, just a few bubbles at any time. Great video at http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/video-the-perfect-simmer-on-your-...)

Discard bones. Strain. 

Cool in fridge for two+ hours until it beautifully settled into fat on the top and gorgeous gelatin-y stock on the bottom.

Set aside skimmed fat (I put into ice cube tray, then put in freezer storage).

Eat, chill extra in fridge up to 5 days; freeze the rest (I put into mini-muffin tray, then put in freezer storage).

 

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Comments

I just wanted to add my new fave way of freezing broth. Put a Silpat on top of a baking sheet. Spread or spoon the broth fairly evenly with a few spaces to help with breaking (although really, that's easy). Freeze well. Break into pieces, pop the pieces in a container, and put it back in the freezer. That way, I have flat slices that melt quickly in a pan for veggies, etc. I saute in broth.
Nice tip, Pam. I did something similar last fall with our mint by freezing it in a thin layer of water so that it was easy to break into pieces. We use the pieces to make herbal tea or will throw some into a Turkish soup we like that's made with red lentils.
Ah! I do that with parsley, too.

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